Pause Life Coaching

You suspect that, “I may have a bit of that ADHD.”

Perhaps you took my ADHD quiz.

Or you read an article. Someone showed you a checklist.
Maybe a family member has been diagnosed.

Now you’re worried. Wondering, “Do I have this mindset? Or could it be something else?”

Adult ADHD is real. It is estimated that 85% of adults living with ADHD are undiagnosed.

The general public is often surprised to learn that adults can have ADHD. While most people are aware children have ADHD, they don’t realize it also affects adults too. However, ADHD doesn’t disappear on your 18th birthday!

ADHD changes into adulthood. Hyperactivity lessens with age, and adults develop coping strategies; both consciously and unconsciously to help them succeed in the world. It means that ADHD is less visible to the casual observer.

Some adults have known since childhood that they have ADHD. However, what they are now experiencing are different challenges. Learning skills on how to do well in school, are now replaced with the need to learn how to do well in a work environment, manage a household and take care of finances etc.

You may wonder what’s the point of getting a diagnosis? You’ve made it this far in life, why bother?

You think the only reason to get a diagnosis is if you want to use medication as a treatment and you’re not interested in medication.

Fact, if you are an adult with ADHD, getting a diagnosis is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself.

Here’s why: Read More

Grown women don’t have ADD, do they?!?

Oh, yes. In fact, women are the fastest growing population of newly diagnosed ADHDers.

Do any of these sound like you?

“I know exactly what I need to do, but I just can’t get myself to do it.”

“If I’m so smart, why do I feel so dumb?

“Why do the simplest things seem so hard for me?”

“Why can’t I get my act together?”

Have you ever felt this way? If so, you aren’t alone — in your conflicting emotions, your healing, or your chance at a new start.

Maybe you’ve gotten the ADHD diagnosis or you suspect you or someone you care about lives with it.

Here are seven steps to get the ball rolling to understanding yourself better and living the life you want to live your way!

Read More

Who is this older gentleman feverishly taking notes, wearing a business suit at the CHADD Conference? I assumed him a physician or school administrator. WRONG! He raises his hand and asks, “How can I be there for my granddaughter to support all her interests. She has so many. I want her to know I care but it’s hard when her interests change daily.” Wow. What a lucky girl his granddaughter is to call this gentleman Grandpa.

In another session, for women with ADHD, many women stood up and shared their struggles with ADHD and what they’ve learned to do to live with more ease. Their honesty, vulnerability, and sense of humor moved me beyond words. Talking about it with each other gives us community, support and understanding. Ladies, we are all stronger when we lean on each other. I urge you to find support in your community or start your own group!

For some at the conference, they would come out of a session and say, “I thought the speaker was talking about me! He described me, my habits, my fears, my goofs, my oops, my need for speed. He even knew of my desires to do more, to do it better, to do it without reminders, to not let others down, to not let myself down. I came here for someone else I care about with ADHD and discovered my own ADHD.”

That first self-diagnosis can leave many unsettled. Not knowing how to tell others. Not wanting judgment. Not knowing what to do next.

I’m  grateful for the ADHD community of professionals who work tirelessly to reach others who could really start rocking and rolling in their lives with just a little support.

Mostly, I’m grateful for those who are already stepping up and supporting someone they love living with ADHD.

What can you do when someone shares they suspect or know they’re living with ADHD?

Read More